Green Line Solutions News

Virtual Reality Series Part III |

Thomas Topp - Thursday, February 09, 2017

This article is the third in a short series about virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR); having discussed the origins of the concepts and the applications of the technologies, this article will focus on contemporary VR and AR devices on the market. The next and final article will be a case study on adopting AR as a lifestyle.


Virtual Reality Series

Part III: Contemporary VR and AR Devices


Today’s commercial VR devices are either mobile or tethered; that is they either work off of a smartphone, or require a physical connection to a computer or game console. Obviously, each option has its advantages and drawbacks, such as portability versus definition.

Several devices are currently on the market, falling into one of the two categories; Samsung Gear VR and Google Daydream View, for example, are mobile, while the Oculus Rift and PlayStation VR are tethered.

Mobile headsets are two lenses in a cardboard or plastic shell that has a slot for a smartphone. The software splits the screen into two almost-circular identical images, while the lenses bend the light so that the user perceives a 3D landscape. Because these headsets do not have hardware of their own, they tend to be inexpensive.

Additionally, because the smartphone is used as the monitor and VR system, the headset can be worn anywhere. However, smartphones are not specialized for VR and therefore they do not offer comparable graphics to tethered VR devices.

Tethered devices are able to offer a more complex experience by relegating the computing and processing to the VR or gaming console. Tethered devices also tend to offer better head-tracking and less image lag thanks to the built-in motion sensors and camera(s).

Beyond having to be physically connected to the console, tethered devices are also more expensive than mobile units because they are more than just a shell. Users would have to own the PlayStation 4, for example, and then by the PS VR for about $400 plus any add-ons and accessories; while PC-based platforms require powerful computers.


Mobile Devices

  • Samsung Gear VR ($85) offers on-board touchpad and a resolution of 2,560 by 1,440 pixels, but the refresh rate is dependant on the phone.

  • Google Daydream View ($50) is the least expensive option but the resolution and refresh rate depend on the phone.


Tethered Devices

  • Sony PlayStation VR ($400) includes external visual positioning, a field of view of 100 degrees, and a refresh rate of 120 Hz, but the resolution is 960 by 1,080 pixels (per eye).

  • HTC Vive ($800) includes camera and external motion tracking with 110 degrees of visibility and 1,080 by 1,200 pixel resolution (per eye), but is run off of a PC and is the most expensive VR package.

  • Oculus Rift ($700) includes external visual positioning, a field of view of 110 degrees, and 1,080 by 1,200 pixel resolution (per eye), but the refresh rate is 90 Hz and it requires the Oculus Touch or Xbox One Gamepad.